instagram.com/p/sK6nvnD5Nc/#slatertrout instagram.com/p/mK3Vz_nc71/#sweatengine instagram.com/p/sMQT6Oy7nR/#ara.foto instagram.com/p/sLHHr3mfqP/#shantell_martin instagram.com/p/kmvJ-qOzBF/#timelapsechicago

instagram:

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPtimelapse

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

The goal this weekend is to capture creative time lapse videos. Some tips to get you started:

  • Unlike slow motion videos that are meant to highlight a single moment, time lapse works best when showing a scene over a period of time. Experiment with how time lapse can reveal the rhythms of nature or the patterns in the way groups of people move.
  • Time lapse is also a great way to show process. Whether preparing a meal from start to finish or documenting a work of art as it takes shape, think about the otherwise long actions that you can speed up and show in their entirety.
  • For those on iOS, try using Hyperlapse from Instagram to film your shot. If you’re on Android, check out apps like Lapse It, Time Lapse and Frame Lapse.

For more on how to capture the perfect time lapse video, check out these tips from New York Instagrammer Kevin Lu (@sweatengine).

PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPtimelapse hashtag to videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own videos to the project. Any tagged videos taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured Monday morning.

instagram.com/p/sFnSInxPEn/#helloandywest
instagram.com/p/sHzisXOIEE/#neilmckenzie89 instagram.com/p/sHxgoCkZui/#sewyoursoul instagram.com/p/sIYa5AJEJF/#lisapie

instagram:

Step Inside London’s Felt Cornershop

To view more photos and videos from Lucy’s Cornershop, explore the The Cornershop location page, browse the #thecornershop hashtag and follow @sewyoursoul on Instagram.

Look closely at a corner shop in East London and you’ll see everything is not as it seems. The Cornershop, opened in a derelict store in Bethnal Green by artist Lucy Sparrow (@sewyoursoul), is actually an art installation which consists of 4,000 items all handmade from felt! From Heinz Baked Beans to Digestive Biscuits, everything in the shop is hand-stitched and the whole shop took Lucy eight months to assemble.

“I wanted to create something that surrounded people completely,” says Lucy, whose first job was in her local corner shop. “I hope this project reminds people just how much the cornershop cements life in local communities.” The installation runs until August 31.

instagram.com/p/rm4L6oB2xj/#yvarcade instagram.com/p/rxuRdyl7Hj/#tljang instagram.com/p/r7h7e8EaQV/#cayennechristine instagram.com/p/r-bGV1r0Gs/#nelizaway instagram.com/p/rxtd4ZF7GD/#tljang instagram.com/p/sEvZNtoNbv#bodegagoods instagram.com/p/rusTppB2-u/#yvarcade

instagram:

Douglas Coupland’s everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything

For more photos and videos from everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything, follow @vanartgallery on Instagram and browse the couplandvan hashtag.

Douglas Coupland's show at the Vancouver Art Gallery (@vanartgallery) is highly interactive. “It’s creatively satisfying to crowdsource objects,” the artist says. “In this show I have works made from crowd-sourced Lego, chewing gum, plastic bottle lids and cigarette foil. Anything can be beautiful.”

Visitors to the show have been encouraged to take pictures and share them with the #CouplandVan hashtag. “Much of the show is based on how we’re all collectively changing the way we see the world,” Douglas says. “Not allowing smart-phone photography seemed ridiculous. People focus in on what suits them the most. It’s interesting for me to see which slogans in the Slogan Room are posted the most.”

everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything closes on September 1.

instagram.com/p/qhKrbejjrY/#acidinvader instagram.com/p/qFIoAdjjuu/#acidinvader instagram.com/p/pZIMd3Dji-/#acidinvader instagram.com/p/mD8ag3jjkF/#acidinvader instagram.com/p/rKZUsPDjgy/#acidinvader instagram.com/p/p4Bkyejjni/#acidinvader

instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.”

instagram.com/p/r5qK-6H-h6/#markotto instagram.com/p/rFaLqLn-un/#markotto instagram.com/p/qKD3Z6n-vW/#markotto instagram.com/p/rIDbCbn-gS/#markotto instagram.com/p/r2MkCAn-lL/#markotto

instagram:

Finding Vibrant Moments in High School Life with @markotto

For more bold, bright snapshots from the new school year, follow Mark Otto (@markotto) on Instagram.

Seventeen-year-old Mark Otto first started experimenting with color when he was living abroad in Hungary, away from his family and friends. “I realized the city felt a little too dark and it made me a little sad,” he says. “I started to use Instagram to showcase the few colorful things I could find.”

After he returned to Ohio this year, he continued to use photography—and minimalism—as a way to express himself. “Minimalism kind of showcases the color as the subject instead of the background,” he explains. “I’d have to say that colors are probably the best thing to happen to our universe.”

Mark makes a point to frame unextraordinary objects—things that his friends see around them every day—as a way to emphasize his particular perspective on the world. “People get to see how I see things,” he says.

And it’s not just about him. From Polaroids of his friends to a back-to-school pencil set, his Instagram feed also uniquely, and unabashedly, explores what it’s like to be in high school. “I believe that our generation is using the Internet to make connections and showcase our art,” he says. “Young adults totally own the Internet world.”

instagram.com/p/sKtV16Aw8j/#dguttenfelder instagram.com/p/sKszOSgw7x/#dguttenfelder

instagram:

Hyperlapsing in Yellowstone National Park with @dguttenfelder

To see more of David’s videos and photographs, follow @dguttenfelder on Instagram.

“I’m redefining myself as a photographer in my home country,” says photojournalist David Guttenfelder (@dguttenfelder). Based in Japan and India for the past 15 years, David worked across Asia, from war-torn Afghanistan to reclusive North Korea, where his Instagram feed became an unique window into a secluded world. This year, he returns to the United States as a National Geographic (@natgeo) photography fellow, working on a long-term project about the ecosystem surrounding Yellowstone National Park. National Geographic was given a preview of Instagram’s new Hyperlapse app, and David was one of the first photographers to try it out, recording the bison that he now shares the road with on his daily commute.

“I will spend the next year in America’s Wild West,” he explains, adding: “What could be a more perfect homecoming?”

instagram:

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram

Since launching nearly four years ago, it has always been a priority to bring the Instagram community simple yet powerful tools that let people capture moments and express their creativity. Today, we’re excited to announce Hyperlapse from Instagram, a new app to capture high-quality time lapse videos even while in motion.

Traditionally, time lapse videos depend on holding your phone or camera still while you film. Hyperlapse from Instagram features built-in stabilization technology that lets you create moving, handheld time lapses that result in a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.

We designed Hyperlapse to be as simple as possible. You don’t need an account to create a hyperlapse. Instead, you open up straight to the camera. Tap once to begin recording and tap again to stop. Choose a playback speed that you like between 1x-12x and tap the green check mark to save it to your camera roll. You can share your video on Instagram easily from there.

From documenting your whole commute in seconds or the preparation of your dinner from start to finish to capturing an entire sunset as it unfolds, we’re thrilled about the creative possibilities Hyperlapse unlocks. We can’t wait to see what you’ll create.

To learn more about what stabilization looks like in Hyperlapse, check out this video.

To learn more about Hyperlapse from Instagram, check out help.instagram.com.

Hyperlapse from Instagram is available today for iOS devices in Apple’s App Store. It is currently only available for iOS.

instagram.com/p/sDAmrRAnnp/#lomokev 
instagram.com/p/sCZE0cFzlp/#london_streetphotography
instagram.com/p/sDEpZUMp2g/#miss_jess
instagram.com/p/sEjUXTtOqb/#tomskipp 
instagram.com/p/sFJqLxEP__/#tomskipp

instagram:

Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms

To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram.

On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.

The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.

This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.

“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”

instagram.com/p/sGdmWEifbR/#suzysaysrelax instagram.com/p/sHBJ5cqPWd/#shaneml instagram.com/p/sGmc1yuOKN/#jasonbodak instagram.com/p/sGw7VgvQ0j/#karlstream instagram.com/p/sFjXdtkkk7/#jeffro instagram.com/p/sG8fFTOzWs/#nonametwentyseven instagram.com/p/sGLnYVyBII/#vladimir.rosario instagram.com/p/sHG3PUk3Cm/#americangarage instagram.com/p/sGLnaFzIgv/#kneeseespieces

instagram:

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPcarcorners

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

This weekend’s tag was #WHPcarcorners, which asked participants to capture the details of cars from a unique angle. Every Monday we feature some of our favorite submissions from the project, but be sure to check out the rest here.

instagram.com/p/sDZhZ_y3SS/#janhan513 instagram.com/p/qj5AUUQGlQ/#anastasiaepic instagram.com/p/sDc48rpRfx/#rgokceer instagram.com/p/sAmM6RidJY/#07l6 instagram.com/p/r-cbmQyTf-/#romicookie instagram.com/p/k-POxgNbiH/#johnchurchill84 instagram.com/p/r7ttwhAnKV/#irunchio

instagram:

A Photographic Tour of Sherlock’s London

For a deeper view into London’s most popular landmarks and buildings, check out the #londonsights hashtag on Instagram. To follow “Sherlock” at the 2014 Emmys, browse the #Emmys hashtag.

To fans of the novels and the BBC series, the locations featured in the Sherlock Holmes stories are almost as iconic as the characters themselves.

The most famous of all is 221B Baker Street, the home of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Although London’s official Holmes museum now bears that number, the address was completely fictional when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first “Sherlock” novel in 1887—building numbers on Baker Street did not yet extend that high. The flat shown on the British television show is actually located on the much-quieter North Gower Street, near Euston station.

Next door to Sherlock’s imaginary home is Speedy’s Cafe, a frequent filming spot for actors Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and Martin Freeman (Watson). Speedy’s is a real restaurant and a destination site for super-fans—they even have a Sherlock-themed wrap on the menu. Another notable filming location for the television series is St. Bart’s Hospital in Smithfield, the oldest hospital in Europe and backdrop for Sherlock’s final showdown with arch-nemesis Moriarty.