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Sneaker Mashups and the Art of @filfury

To see more creative sneaker mashups from Phil Robson, follow @filfury on Instagram.

“I hate sneakers getting old and tired. My art acts as a way of preserving them,” say UK graphic artist and director Phil Robson, aka “Fury” (@filfury).

Using his own photographs and some Photoshop ingenuity, Fury creates digital sneaker mashups of things like insects, bats, skulls and moths. To create a butterfly from a pair of Nike Air Max 93s, Phil plays off the sneaker’s various textures. “I love the shoe’s paneling, the soft curves of the upper and the harsh rubber chiseled sole. The two surfaces contrast, and makes me think about a before and after, like the soft wings of a butterfly have come from the hard casing on the cocooned sole.”

Fury is especially drawn to objects that have bold forms, symmetry, and sharp angles. “I love taking the recognizable textures from my favorite shoes and making a new form with them,” he says. “I guess it was a natural progression for me to mix my passions.”

His digital artwork shared on Instagram began as a passion project but is now developing into some real life sculpture interpretations. “Next level for me,” Fury says, “would be to direct an animated piece based off my mashup stylings. I’m just waiting for the brief.”

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Radical Self-Expression at the Burning Man Festival in Black Rock City

To view more photos and videos from Black Rock City, explore the Burning Man location page, browse the #BM2014 hashtag and follow @missjessrose on Instagram.

“It’s way more than you can imagine,” says Jessica Rose Yurasek (@missjessrose), describing Black Rock City, the site of the annual Burning Man festival. Each year, a global tribe of artists, makers, and performers converge in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, birthing a pop-up city of more than 60,000 “Burners” and their acts of radical self-expression.

In contrast to an inhospitable physical terrain, which ranges from scorching heat to torrential rain, Jessica sees Black Rock City as an inspirational place of generosity and creativity. The weeklong gathering culminates with the burning of a towering wooden effigy known at “the Man”, and then disperses, taking care to leave no trace in the desert.

“If we as humanity can build this,” she says, “then I have hope for our future.”

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The Strange, Small World of C+C Mini Factory

For more photos and videos from the strange world of C+C Mini Factory, follow @ccminifactory on Instagram.

For Chelsea Cates and Quinn Corbin, each fantastical C+C Mini Factory (@ccminifactory) photo begins with their vast collection of miniatures and found images. “The tone is meant to be playful and theatrical,” Chelsea says. “Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes it’s absurd, and sometimes we’re not even sure what those animals are up to—they have secrets.”

Their last initials—and nostalgia—inspired the name. “We’re children of the 90s so it seemed appropriate for our name to be a nod to 90s pop culture,” Chelsea says, “and the fact that we don’t take ourselves too seriously.”

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Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPtimelapse

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

The goal this weekend is to capture creative time lapse videos. Some tips to get you started:

  • Unlike slow motion videos that are meant to highlight a single moment, time lapse works best when showing a scene over a period of time. Experiment with how time lapse can reveal the rhythms of nature or the patterns in the way groups of people move.
  • Time lapse is also a great way to show process. Whether preparing a meal from start to finish or documenting a work of art as it takes shape, think about the otherwise long actions that you can speed up and show in their entirety.
  • For those on iOS, try using Hyperlapse from Instagram to film your shot. If you’re on Android, check out apps like Lapse It, Time Lapse and Frame Lapse.

For more on how to capture the perfect time lapse video, check out these tips from New York Instagrammer Kevin Lu (@sweatengine).

PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPtimelapse hashtag to videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own videos to the project. Any tagged videos taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured Monday morning.

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Step Inside London’s Felt Cornershop

To view more photos and videos from Lucy’s Cornershop, explore the The Cornershop location page, browse the #thecornershop hashtag and follow @sewyoursoul on Instagram.

Look closely at a corner shop in East London and you’ll see everything is not as it seems. The Cornershop, opened in a derelict store in Bethnal Green by artist Lucy Sparrow (@sewyoursoul), is actually an art installation which consists of 4,000 items all handmade from felt! From Heinz Baked Beans to Digestive Biscuits, everything in the shop is hand-stitched and the whole shop took Lucy eight months to assemble.

“I wanted to create something that surrounded people completely,” says Lucy, whose first job was in her local corner shop. “I hope this project reminds people just how much the cornershop cements life in local communities.” The installation runs until August 31.

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Douglas Coupland’s everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything

For more photos and videos from everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything, follow @vanartgallery on Instagram and browse the couplandvan hashtag.

Douglas Coupland's show at the Vancouver Art Gallery (@vanartgallery) is highly interactive. “It’s creatively satisfying to crowdsource objects,” the artist says. “In this show I have works made from crowd-sourced Lego, chewing gum, plastic bottle lids and cigarette foil. Anything can be beautiful.”

Visitors to the show have been encouraged to take pictures and share them with the #CouplandVan hashtag. “Much of the show is based on how we’re all collectively changing the way we see the world,” Douglas says. “Not allowing smart-phone photography seemed ridiculous. People focus in on what suits them the most. It’s interesting for me to see which slogans in the Slogan Room are posted the most.”

everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything closes on September 1.

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A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.”

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Finding Vibrant Moments in High School Life with @markotto

For more bold, bright snapshots from the new school year, follow Mark Otto (@markotto) on Instagram.

Seventeen-year-old Mark Otto first started experimenting with color when he was living abroad in Hungary, away from his family and friends. “I realized the city felt a little too dark and it made me a little sad,” he says. “I started to use Instagram to showcase the few colorful things I could find.”

After he returned to Ohio this year, he continued to use photography—and minimalism—as a way to express himself. “Minimalism kind of showcases the color as the subject instead of the background,” he explains. “I’d have to say that colors are probably the best thing to happen to our universe.”

Mark makes a point to frame unextraordinary objects—things that his friends see around them every day—as a way to emphasize his particular perspective on the world. “People get to see how I see things,” he says.

And it’s not just about him. From Polaroids of his friends to a back-to-school pencil set, his Instagram feed also uniquely, and unabashedly, explores what it’s like to be in high school. “I believe that our generation is using the Internet to make connections and showcase our art,” he says. “Young adults totally own the Internet world.”

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Hyperlapsing in Yellowstone National Park with @dguttenfelder

To see more of David’s videos and photographs, follow @dguttenfelder on Instagram.

“I’m redefining myself as a photographer in my home country,” says photojournalist David Guttenfelder (@dguttenfelder). Based in Japan and India for the past 15 years, David worked across Asia, from war-torn Afghanistan to reclusive North Korea, where his Instagram feed became an unique window into a secluded world. This year, he returns to the United States as a National Geographic (@natgeo) photography fellow, working on a long-term project about the ecosystem surrounding Yellowstone National Park. National Geographic was given a preview of Instagram’s new Hyperlapse app, and David was one of the first photographers to try it out, recording the bison that he now shares the road with on his daily commute.

“I will spend the next year in America’s Wild West,” he explains, adding: “What could be a more perfect homecoming?”